Switch to:
More From Other Websites
Fed to stress test banks for 60% stock market dive, $110 oil Oct 23 2014
Fallout from Ocwen allegations Oct 23 2014
Midday Glance: Banks companies Oct 23 2014
Midday Glance: Banks companies Oct 23 2014
Early Glance: Banks companies Oct 23 2014
Early Glance: Banks companies Oct 23 2014
Europe REITs ETF for a Recovering Property Market Oct 23 2014
Final Glance: Banks companies Oct 22 2014
Final Glance: Banks companies Oct 22 2014
[video]1 in 5 Middle-Class Americans Would Rather Die Early Than Retire Poor Oct 22 2014
New Issue- Wells Fargo prices 1.25 bln euro 2021 bond Oct 22 2014
[video] Did Results Give Investors a Better View of Banks? Oct 22 2014
America's housing policy: The definition of insanity Oct 22 2014
Middle-class adults have $20K saved for retirement Oct 22 2014
Wells Fargo Survey Finds Saving for Retirement Not Happening for a Third of Middle Class Oct 22 2014
Wells Fargo Donates $150,000 to Fight Ebola Crisis Oct 22 2014
Wells Fargo Survey Finds Saving for Retirement Not Happening for a Third of Middle Class Oct 22 2014
Wells Fargo Banks on European Real Estate Oct 22 2014
ON THE MOVE-Wells Fargo hires two brokers, reports dip in sales force Oct 21 2014
The 20 Most Profitable Companies in the World Oct 21 2014


Add Notes, Comments

If you want to ask a question, or report a bug, please create a support ticket.

User Comments

Rrurban
ReplyRrurban - 5 months ago
Libertadpp,
depends on how you calc FCF. if you add-in changes in working capital,i.e using operating cash flow - capex, then FCF will be higher than net income if there were positive changes in working cap. also, if the company has a lot of goodwill (and thus goodwill amortization), FCF will be higher than net income. i would avoid companies with a lot of goodwill as they have done acquisitions and aren't growing organically (possible flawed biz model) and there is a risk they overpaid for an acquisition and will have to write down goodwill and eps will be hit as a result.
Libertadpp
ReplyLibertadpp - 7 months ago
How can Free Cash Flow be always bigger than net income?, because of high ROIC?
Steve Pomeranz
ReplySteve Pomeranz - 7 months ago
It would be nice if we could make adjustments to the dividend growth rate using the 3 year in addition to the 5 year, WFC is a good example because due to the crash, the 5 year is not a true picture of future dividend growth. Using only the 5 year growth rate for WFC, renders the yield on cost number to be of no use.

Otherwise this page is fantastic and a great tool. Thanks.


Get WordPress Plugins for easy affiliate links on Stock Tickers and Guru Names | Earn affiliate commissions by embedding GuruFocus Charts
GuruFocus Affiliate Program: Earn up to $400 per referral. ( Learn More)
Free 7-day Trial
FEEDBACK