John Rogers

Last Update: 06-10-2015

Number of Stocks: 187
Number of New Stocks: 4

Total Value: $8,922 Mil
Q/Q Turnover: 9%

Countries: USA
Details: Top Buys | Top Sales | Top Holdings  Embed:

John Rogers Watch

  • John Rogers' Ariel Fund February Monthly Commentary

    A year ago, we analyzed performance since the market bottom in March 2009. We often repeat topics but did not anticipate a sequel to that commentary. And yet we are indeed providing an update because the story remains compelling and thought provoking.


    We will summarize last year’s perspective briefly. In the first two months of 2009, pessimism was ubiquitous and powerful. While almost everyone was talking about the preceding decade as “lost” for stocks, we were saying extraordinarily cheap stocks were likely paving the way for a great decade to come. Last year represented the 5-year anniversary of the market bottom marking the end of the financial crisis—an obvious halfway point. For that reason, we weighed in on the market’s progress; the news was very good. Interestingly, it has only gotten better since then.

      


  • January Commentary from Ariel Fund's John Rogers

    In January 2013, we devoted our monthly commentary to asset flows and have since found it a good way to kick off the year. Interestingly, before the 2007-2009 financial crisis, it was a rather dry task to track the amounts investors put into and pulled out of various mutual funds. In the wake of that epic bear market, however, investor behavior shifted dramatically and made the topic more intriguing. The flows from 2012 showed a big preference for bonds over stocks, a huge swing from actively managed equity portfolios to passive ones and a much greater fondness for funds with stellar short-term performance. The 2013 flows looked better, with inflows to taxable bond, international stock and U.S. stock funds (including active U.S. stock funds) and less performance chasing.


    The 2014 flow data show a return to the behavior that concerned us from 2008 to 2012. All four big, traditional asset classes – U.S. equity, international equity, taxable bond, and municipal bond – had inflows in 2014. That said, of the $201 billion flowing into the four groups, $107 billion went to international equity, taxable bond funds attracted $51 billion, $29 billion flowed to municipal bond funds, and U.S. equity received a mere $13 billion. One of the smart, key themes of this century has been a push toward more global portfolios, so many investors have been playing catch up with their international allocations. While the huge inflows to international stock funds therefore make some sense, we are puzzled by muni bonds drawing twice as much money as U.S. stocks.

      


  • Guru Stocks at 52-Week Lows: XOM, AXP, DISCA, RL, SNI

    According to GuruFocus list of 52-week lows, these Guru stocks have reached their 52-week lows.


    Exxon Mobil Corporation (XOM) reached the 52-week low of $89.19

      


  • Weekly CEO Buys Highlight: BH, WMS, MBFI, PKY, HOS

    According to GuruFocus Insider Data, these are the largest CEO buys during the past week. The overall trend of CEOs is illustrated in the chart below:


    Biglari Holdings Inc (BH): Chairman and CEO, 10% owner Sardar Biglari bought 2,506 shares

      


  • John Rogers Increases His Position in MN

    John Rogers (Trades, Portfolio) of Ariel Investment, LLC recently increased his position in Manning & Napier Inc (MN). There are currently 186 stocks in his portfolio, valued at $7.750 billion with a quarter over quarter turnover rate of 8%.


    John Rogers (Trades, Portfolio) showed an interest in the stock market when he was only 12 years old, when his father would buy him stocks as Christmas and birthday presents. As an alumnus of Princeton University where he studied economics, he received the Woodrow Wilson Award in 2008, which is the most prestigious award, given to those who embody a career in national service.

      


  • Still Bullish On Dun & Bradstreet

    In this article, let's take a look at Dun & Bradstreet Corp. (DNB), a $4.21 billion market cap company, which is a worldwide provider of business information and related decision support services and commercial receivables management services.


    Little Growth

      


  • John Rogers Ariel Funds Q4 2014 Commentary

    Investing in small- and mid-cap stocks is riskier and more volatile than investing in large-cap stocks. The intrinsic value of the stocks in which the portfolio invests may never be recognized by the broader market. Ariel Fund often invests a significant portion of its assets in companies within the financial services and consumer discretionary sectors, and its performance may suffer if these sectors underperform the overall stock market.


    Performance data quoted represents past performance. Past performance does not guarantee future results. All performance assumes the reinvestment of dividends and capital gains, and represents returns of the Investor Class shares. The investment return and principal value of an investment will fluctuate so that an investor’s shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance data quoted. For the period ended December 31, 2014, the average annual total returns of Ariel Fund (Investor Class) for the 1-, 5- and 10-year periods were +10.95%, +16.62% and +7.16%, respectively. Ariel Fund’s Investor Class shares had an annual expense ratio of 1.03% for the year ended September 30, 2014. Ariel Fund’s Investor Class shares had an annual expense ratio of 1.03% for the year ended September 30, 2013. Performance data current to the most recent month-end for Ariel Fund may be obtained by visiting our website, arielinvestments.com.

      


  • Weekly Guru Bargains Highlights: NFLX, CS, CAT, HAL, SLB

    According to GuruFocus updates, these stocks have declined the most since Gurus have bought.



    Netflix Inc (NFLX): Down 26% Since George Soros (Trades, Portfolio) Bought In the Quarter Ended on 2014-09-30

      


  • Respected Value Investor John Rogers Of The Ariel Fund Shares His Top Three Picks For 2015

    Where does John Rogers (Trades, Portfolio) see value in 2015.


    He believes industrial companies are well set for 2015 thanks to lower energy costs.

      


  • John Rogers' Ariel Fund December Commentary

    Investments in foreign securities may underperform and may be more volatile than comparable U.S. stocks because of the risks involving foreign economies and markets, foreign political systems, foreign regulatory standards and foreign currencies and taxes. The use of currency derivatives and exchange-traded funds (ETFs) may increase investment losses and expenses and create more volatility. Investments in emerging and developing markets present additional risks, such as difficulties in selling on a timely basis and at an acceptable price. The intrinsic value of the stocks in which the portfolio invests may never be recognized by the broader market.


    Performance data quoted represents past performance. Past performance does not guarantee future results. All performance assumes the reinvestment of dividends and capital gains and represents returns of the Investor Class shares. The investment return and principal value of an investment will fluctuate so that an investor’s shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance data quoted. Performance data current to the most recent month-end for the Funds may be obtained by visiting our website, arielinvestments.com.

      


  • Various Hedge Fund Managers Bet on American Express

    In this article, let's take a look at American Express Company (AXP), a $94.23 billion market cap company that is a leading global payments and travel & expense services company.


    Spending patterns

      


  • John Rogers' October Commentary

    Recently, we have been concentrating on fundamentals—by rereading one of our favorite books, A Random Walk Down Wall Street, by Princeton professor Burton G. Malkiel. We highly recommend the 10th edition, which was revised in 2012. It remains a timeless, thoughtful meditation on efficient markets.


    This great tome has become reduced and simplified to one notion in the popular imagination: Buy index funds. While it certainly helped launch passive investing, Random Walk contains a great deal more than one simple lesson. Ironically, the crucial insight embedded in its title all too often gets lost—the stock market follows a random walk. Dr. Malkiel writes: A random walk is one in which future steps or direction cannot be predicted on the basis of past history.

      


  • Johnson & Johnson Fairly Valued – I Will Bet on It

    In this article, let´s consider Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), a $297.71 billion market cap that is the world's largest and most diverse healthcare company. It has a trailing P/E ratio that indicates that the stock is relatively undervalued (PE 19.4x vs Industry Median 42.0x).


    Key drivers

      


  • Some Drivers of the World's Largest Automaker

    In this article, let's take a look at Toyota Motor Corporation (TM), a $182.43 billion market cap company that is one of the world's largest automobile producers.


    Quality and more

      


  • John Rogers Ariel Appreciation Fund Q3 Commentary

    Investing in mid-cap stocks is riskier and more volatile than investing in large-cap stocks. The intrinsic value of the stocks in which the portfolio invests may never be recognized by the broader market. Ariel Appreciation Fund often invests a significant portion of its assets in companies within the financial services and consumer discretionary sectors and its performance may suffer if these sectors underperform the overall stock market.


    Performance data quoted represents past performance. Past performance does not guarantee future results. All performance assumes the reinvestment of dividends and capital gains and represents returns of the Investor Class shares. The investment return and principal value of an investment will fluctuate so that an investor’s shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance data quoted. For the period ended September 30, 2014, the average annual total returns of Ariel Appreciation Fund (Investor Class) for the 1-, 5- and 10-year periods were +12.22%, +16.54% and +8.80%, respectively. The Fund’s Investor Class shares had an annual expense ratio of 1.13% for the year ended September 30, 2013. Performance data current to the most recent month-end for Ariel Appreciation Fund may be obtained by visiting our website, arielinvestments.com.

      


  • John Rogers' Ariel Fund Q3 2014 Commentary

    Investing in small- and mid-cap stocks is riskier and more volatile than investing in large-cap stocks. The intrinsic value of the stocks in which the portfolio invests may never be recognized by the broader market. Ariel Fund often invests a significant portion of its assets in companies within the financial services and consumer discretionary sectors, and its performance may suffer if these sectors underperform the overall stock market.


    Performance data quoted represents past performance. Past performance does not guarantee future results. All performance assumes the reinvestment of dividends and capital gains and represents returns of the Investor Class shares. The investment return and principal value of an investment will fluctuate so that an investor’s shares, when redeemed, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Current performance may be lower or higher than the performance data quoted. For the period ended September 30, 2014, the average annual total returns of Ariel Fund (Investor Class) for the 1-, 5- and 10-year periods were +15.52%, +16.46% and +7.18%, respectively. Ariel Fund’s Investor Class shares had an annual expense ratio of 1.03% for the year ended September 30, 2013. Performance data current to the most recent month-end for Ariel Fund may be obtained by visiting our website, arielinvestments.com.

      


  • Southern Company a Fairly Valued Stock

    In this article, let´s consider Southern Company (SO), a $42.29 billion market cap, which has a trailing P/E ratio that indicates that the stock is relatively undervalued (PE 18.9x vs Industry Median 20.1x). The obvious question I’m sure you want to know is – what is the future stock price movement? Although I cannot predict exactly the moment, we can see some drivers of this Atlanta-based energy holding company, which is one of the largest producers of electricity in the U.S., and then try to analyze its intrinsic value and compare it with the actual trading price.


    Principal drivers

      


  • State Street: A Good Business Model

    In this article, let's take a look at State Street Corporation (STT), a $29.10 billion market cap bank holding company with more than $27 trillion of assets under custody and $2 trillion of assets under management. It operates in 26 countries and more than 100 geographic markets worldwide.


    Global reach

      


  • 5-year lows: Aeropostale Inc, ASA Gold And Precious Metals Ltd, Nuverra Environmental Solutions Inc, and Multi-Fineline Electronix Inc

    According to GuruFocus' list of 5-year lows, these Guru stocks have reached their 5-year lows: Aeropostale Inc, ASA Gold And Precious Metals Ltd, Nuverra Environmental Solutions Inc, and Multi-Fineline Electronix Inc


    Aeropostale Inc (NYSE:ARO) Reached $2.89

      


  • John Rogers' Ariel Investments Monthly Commentary - September

    We continue to field questions concerning the “active versus passive” investing debate. For our part, we largely agree with Morningstar’s Michael Breen, who wrote in his “Give Peace a Chance in the Active vs. Passive Debate” article: [T]here’s value to both active and index approaches. A number of actively managed funds have beaten the broad market, but index funds tracking the market still delivered solid returns over time in a cheap, low-maintenance package that’s a perfect fit for many investors. Meanwhile, those willing to roll up their sleeves and do a little fundamental research appear to have a good chance of picking winning active funds.1


    More on that last point later, but first we want to address where our philosophy comes from and why this heated debate has become even more pertinent lately.

      


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