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Bank of America Corp. Reports Operating Results (10-K)

February 23, 2012 | About:
10qk

10qk

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Bank of America Corp. (BAC) filed Annual Report for the period ended 2011-12-31.

Bank Of Amer Cp has a market cap of $84.49 billion; its shares were traded at around $8.02 with and P/S ratio of 0.7. The dividend yield of Bank Of Amer Cp stocks is 0.5%.

Highlight of Business Operations:

Home Loans includes ongoing loan production activities, certain servicing activities and the CRES home equity portfolio not originally selected for inclusion in the Legacy Asset Servicing portfolio. Servicing activities include collecting cash for principal, interest and escrow payments from borrowers, and disbursing customer draws for lines of credit and accounting for and remitting principal and interest payments to investors and escrow payments to third parties along with responding to non-default related customer inquiries. Home Loans also included insurance operations through June 30, 2011, when the ongoing insurance business was transferred to Card Services following the sale of Balboa.Due to the realignment of CRES, the composition of the Home Loans loan portfolio does not currently reflect a normalized level of credit losses and noninterest expense which we expect will develop over time.Legacy Asset ServicingLegacy Asset Servicing is responsible for servicing and managing the exposures related to selected residential mortgage, home equity and discontinued real estate loan portfolios. These selected loan portfolios include owned loans and loans serviced for others, including loans held in other business segments and All Other (collectively, the Legacy Asset Servicing portfolio). The Legacy Asset Servicing portfolio includes residential mortgage loans, home equity loans and discontinued real estate loans that would not have been originated under our underwriting standards at December 31, 2010. Countrywide loans that were impaired at the time of acquisition (the Countrywide PCI portfolio) as well as certain loans that met a pre-defined delinquency status or probability of default threshold as of January 1, 2011 are also included in the Legacy Asset Servicing portfolio. Since determining the pool of loans to be included in the Legacy Asset Servicing portfolio as of January 1, 2011, the criteria have not changed for this portfolio. However, the criteria for inclusion of certain assets and liabilities in the Legacy Asset Servicing portfolio will continue to be evaluated over time.Legacy Asset Servicing results reflect the net cost of legacy exposures that is included in the results of CRES, including representations and warranties provision, litigation costs, and financial results of the CRES home equity portfolio selected as part of the Legacy Asset Servicing portfolio. In addition, certain revenues and expenses on loans serviced for others, including loans serviced for other business segments and All Other, are included in Legacy Asset Servicing results. The results of the Legacy Asset Servicing residential mortgage and discontinued real estate portfolios are recorded primarily in All Other.Our home retention efforts are part of our servicing activities, along with supervising foreclosures and property dispositions. These default-related activities are performed by Legacy Asset Servicing. In an effort to help our customers avoid foreclosure, Legacy Asset Servicing evaluates various workout options prior to foreclosure sales which, combined with our temporary halt of foreclosures announced in October 2010, has resulted in elongated default timelines. For additional information on our servicing activities and foreclosures, see Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements and Contractual Obligations – Other Mortgage-related Matters on page 63The total owned loans in the Legacy Asset Servicing portfolio decreased $15.7 billion in 2011 to $154.9 billion at December 31, 2011, of which $60.0 billion are reflected on the balance sheet of Legacy Asset Servicing within CRES and the remainder are held on the balance sheet of All Other.OtherThe Other component within CRES includes the results of MSR activities, including net hedge results, together with any related assets or liabilities used as economic hedges. The change in the value of the MSRs reflects the change in discount rates and prepayment speed assumptions, as well as the effect of changes in other assumptions, including the cost to service. These amounts are not allocated between Home Loans and Legacy Asset Servicing since the MSRs are managed as a single asset. For additional information on MSRs, see Note 25 – Mortgage Servicing Rights to the Consolidated Financial Statements. Goodwill assigned to CRES was included in Other; however, the remaining balance of goodwill was written off in its entirety in 2011.CRES ResultsThe CRES net loss increased $10.6 billion to $19.5 billion in 2011 compared to 2010. Revenue declined $13.5 billion to a loss of $3.2 billion due in large part to a decrease of $11.4 billion in mortgage banking income driven by an increase in representations and warranties provision of $8.8 billion and a decrease in core production income of $3.4 billion in 2011. The representations and warranties provision in 2011 included $8.6 billion related to the BNY Mellon Settlement and $7.0 billion related to other exposures. For additional information on representations and warranties, see Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements and Contractual Obligations – Representations and Warranties on page 56 and Note 9 – Representations and Warranties Obligations and Corporate Guarantees to the Consolidated Financial Statements. The decrease in core production income was due to a decline in loan funding volume caused primarily by a drop in market share, which reflected decisions to price certain loan products in order to align the volume of new loan applications with our underwriting capacity in both the retail and correspondent channels and our exit from the correspondent channel in late 2011. Also contributing to the decline in revenue was a $1.3 billion decrease in insurance income due to the sale of Balboa in 2011 and a decline in net interest income primarily due to lower average LHFS balances. Revenue for 2011 also included a pre-tax gain on the sale of Balboa of $752 million, net of an inter-segment advisory fee.The provision for credit losses decreased $4.0 billion to $4.5 billion in 2011 compared to 2010 driven primarily by improving portfolio trends, including lower reserve additions in the Countrywide PCI home equity portfolio.Noninterest expense increased $7.0 billion to $21.9 billion in 2011 compared to 2010 primarily due to a $3.6 billion increase in litigation expense, $1.6 billion higher mortgage-related assessments and waivers costs, higher default-related and other loss mitigation servicing expenses and a non-cash, non-tax deductible goodwill impairment charge of $2.6 billion in 2011 compared to a $2.0 billion goodwill impairment charge in 2010.In 2011, we recorded $1.8 billion of mortgage-related assessments and waivers costs, which included $1.3 billion for compensatory fees as a result of elongated default timelines. These increases were partially offset by a decrease of $1.1 billion in insurance expense due to the sale of Balboa and a decline of $640 million in production expense primarily due to lower origination volumes.

The sensitivity analysis in Table 59 assumes that we take no action in response to these rate shifts over the indicated periods. Our core net interest income was asset sensitive to a parallel move in interest rates at both December 31, 2011 and 2010. As part of our ALM activities, we use securities, residential mortgages, and interest rate and foreign exchange derivatives in managing interest rate sensitivity. The significant decline in long-end rates contributed to the increase in asset sensitivity between 2011 and 2010.SecuritiesThe securities portfolio is an integral part of our ALM position and is primarily comprised of debt securities including MBS and to a lesser extent U.S. Treasury, corporate, municipal and other debt securities. At December 31, 2011 and 2010, we held AFS debt securities of $276.2 billion and $337.6 billion. During 2011 and 2010, we purchased AFS debt securities of $99.5 billion and $199.2 billion, sold $116.8 billion and $97.5 billion, and had maturities and received paydowns of $56.7 billion and $70.9 billion. We realized $3.4 billion and $2.5 billion in net gains on sales of debt securities during 2011 and 2010. We securitized no mortgage loans into MBS during 2011 compared to $2.4 billion in 2010, which we retained.During 2011, we purchased approximately $35.6 billion of U.S. agency MBS which are classified as held-to-maturity securities. The purchases of these securities are part of our long-term investment activities which include holding these securities to maturity. The classification of these securities as held-to-maturity also mitigates accumulated OCI volatility and possible negative impacts on our regulatory capital requirements under the Basel III capital standards. The contractual maturities of the held-to-maturity securities are greater than 10 years and they are subject to prepayment by the issuers.Accumulated OCI included after-tax net unrealized gains of $3.1 billion and $7.4 billion at December 31, 2011 and 2010, comprised primarily of after-tax net unrealized gains of $3.1 billion and $714 million related to AFS debt securities and after-tax net unrealized gains of $3 million and $6.7 billion related to AFS marketable equity securities. The December 31, 2010 unrealized gain on marketable equity securities was related to our investment in CCB. See Note 5 – Securities to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further discussion on marketable equity securities. The net unrealized gains in accumulated OCI related to AFS debt securities increased $3.9 billion during 2011 to $5.0 billion, primarily due to a lower interest rate environment. We recognized $299 million of other-than-temporary impairment (OTTI) losses in earnings on AFS debt securities in 2011 compared to $970 million on AFS debt and marketable equity securities in 2010. The recognition of OTTI losses on AFS debt and marketable equity securities is based on a variety of factors, including the length of time and extent to which the market value has been less than amortized cost, the financial condition of the issuer of the security including credit ratings and any specific events affecting the operations of the issuer, underlying assets that collateralize the debt security, other industry and macroeconomic conditions, and our intent and ability to hold the security to recovery.Residential Mortgage PortfolioAt December 31, 2011 and 2010, our residential mortgage portfolio was $262.3 billion (which excludes $906 million in residential mortgage loans accounted for under the fair value option) and $258.0 billion. For more information on consumer fair value option loans, see Consumer Credit Risk – Consumer Loans Accounted for Under the Fair Value Option on page 92. Outstanding residential mortgage loans increased $4.3 billion in 2011 as new origination volume was partially offset by paydowns, charge-offs and transfers to foreclosed properties. In addition, we repurchased $7.8 billion of delinquent FHA loans pursuant to our servicing agreements with GNMA which also increased the residential mortgage portfolio during 2011.During 2011 and 2010, we retained $45.5 billion and $63.8 billion in first-lien mortgages originated by CRES and GWIM. We received paydowns of $42.3 billion and $38.2 billion in 2011 and 2010. There were no loans securitized in 2011 compared to $2.4 billion of loans securitized into MBS which we retained in 2010. We recognized gains of $68 million on the securitizations completed in 2010. We purchased $72 million of residential mortgages related to ALM activities in 2011 compared to none in 2010. We sold $109 million and $443 million of residential mortgages in 2011 and 2010, of which all of the 2011 sales were originated residential mortgages and $432 million of the 2010 sales were originated residential mortgages and $11 million were previously purchased from third parties. Net gains on these transactions were minimal.Interest Rate and Foreign Exchange Derivative ContractsInterest rate and foreign exchange derivative contracts are utilized in our ALM activities and serve as an efficient tool to manage our interest rate and foreign exchange risk. We use derivatives to hedge the variability in cash flows or changes in fair value on our balance sheet due to interest rate and foreign exchange components. For additional information on our hedging activities, see Note 4 – Derivatives to the Consolidated Financial Statements.Our interest rate contracts are generally non-leveraged generic interest rate and foreign exchange basis swaps, options, futures and forwards. In addition, we use foreign exchange contracts, including cross-currency interest rate swaps, foreign currency forward contracts and options to mitigate the foreign exchange risk associated with foreign currency-denominated assets and liabilities. Changes to the composition of our derivatives portfolio during 2011 reflect actions taken for interest rate and foreign exchange rate risk management. The decisions to reposition our derivatives portfolio are based upon the current assessment of economic and financial conditions including the interest rate and foreign currency environments, balance sheet composition and trends, and the relative mix of our cash and derivative positions. Table 60 includes derivatives utilized in our ALM activities including those designated as accounting and economic hedging instruments and shows the notional amount, fair value, weighted-average receive-fixed and pay-fixed rates, expected maturity and average estimated durations of our open ALM derivatives at December 31, 2011 and 2010. Our interest rate swap positions, including foreign exchange contracts, were a net receive-fixed position of $67.9 billion and $6.4 billion at December 31, 2011 and 2010. The notional amount of our foreign exchange basis swaps was $262.4 billion and $235.2 billion at December 31, 2011 and 2010. Our futures and forwards notional position, which reflects the net of long and short positions, was a long position of $12.2 billion at December 31, 2011 compared to a short position of $280 million at

2010 Compared to 2009The following discussion and analysis provides a comparison of our results of operations for 2010 and 2009. This discussion should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and related Notes. Tables 7 and 8 contain financial data to supplement this discussion.OverviewNet Income/LossNet loss totaled $2.2 billion in 2010 compared to net income of $6.3 billion in 2009. Including preferred stock dividends, the net loss applicable to common shareholders was $3.6 billion, or $(0.37) per diluted share. Those results compared to a net loss applicable to common shareholders of $2.2 billion, or $(0.29) per diluted share for 2009.Net Interest IncomeNet interest income on a FTE basis increased $4.3 billion to $52.7 billion for 2010 compared to 2009. The increase was due to the impact of deposit pricing and the adoption of new consolidation guidance which contributed $10.5 billion to net interest income in 2010. The increase was partially offset by lower commercial and consumer loan levels, the sale of First Republic in 2010 and lower rates on core assets and trading assets and liabilities, including derivative exposures. The net interest yield on a FTE basis increased 13 bps to 2.78 percent for 2010 compared to 2009 due to the factors described above.Noninterest IncomeNoninterest income decreased $13.8 billion to $58.7 billion in 2010 compared to 2009. Card income decreased $245 million due to the implementation of the CARD Act partially offset by the impact of the new consolidation guidance and higher interchange income. Service charges decreased $1.6 billion largely due to the impact of overdraft policy changes in conjunction with Regulation E, which became effective in the third quarter of 2010 and the impact of our overdraft policy changes implemented in late 2009. Equity investment income decreased $4.8 billion, as net gains on the sales of certain strategic investments during 2010 were less than gains in 2009 that included a $7.3 billion gain related to the sale of a portion of our investment in CCB. Trading account profits decreased $2.2 billion due to more favorable market conditions in 2009 and investor concerns regarding sovereign debt fears and regulatory uncertainty. DVA gains, net of hedges, on derivative liabilities of $262 million for 2010 compared to losses of $662 million for 2009. Mortgage banking income decreased $6.1 billion due to an increase of $4.9 billion in representations and warranties provision and lower volume and margins. Gains on sales of debt securities decreased $2.2 billion driven by a lower volume of sales of debt securities. The decrease also included the impact of losses in 2010 related to portfolio restructuring activities. Other income (loss) improved by $2.4 billion. 2009 included a net negative fair value adjustment related to our own credit of $4.9 billion on structured liabilities compared to a net positive adjustment of $18 million in 2010, and 2009 also included a $3.8 billion gain on the contribution of our merchant services business to a joint venture. Legacy asset write-downs included in other income (loss) were $1.7 billion in 2009 compared to net gains of $256 million in 2010. Impairment losses recognized in earnings on AFS debt securities decreased $1.9 billion reflecting lower impairment write-downs on non-agency RMBS and CDOs.Provision for Credit LossesThe provision for credit losses decreased $20.1 billion to $28.4 billion for 2010 compared to 2009 due to improving portfolio trends across the consumer and commercial portfolios. Net charge-offs totaled $34.3 billion, or 3.60 percent of average loans and leases for 2010 compared to $33.7 billion, or 3.58 percent for 2009.Noninterest ExpenseNoninterest expense increased $16.4 billion to $83.1 billion for 2010 compared to 2009 largely due to goodwill impairment charges of $12.4 billion. The increase was also driven by a $3.6 billion increase in personnel costs reflecting the build out of several businesses, the recognition of expense on proportionally larger 2009 incentive deferrals and the U.K. payroll tax on certain year-end incentive payments, as well as a $1.6 billion increase in litigation costs. These increases were partially offset by a $901 million decline in merger and restructuring charges compared to 2009. Noninterest expense for 2009 included a special FDIC assessment of $724 million. Income Tax ExpenseIncome tax expense was $915 million for 2010 compared to a benefit of $1.9 billion for 2009. The effective tax rate in 2010 was not meaningful due to the impact of non-deductible goodwill impairment charges of $12.4 billion. The effective tax rate for 2010 excluding goodwill impairment charges was 8.3 percent compared to (44.0) percent in 2009. The change in the effective tax rate from the prior year was primarily driven by an increase in pre-tax income excluding the non-deductible goodwill impairment charges. Also impacting the 2010 effective tax rate was a $392 million charge from a U.K. law change and a $1.7 billion tax benefit from the release of a portion of the deferred tax asset valuation allowance related to acquired capital loss carryforward tax benefits compared to $650 million in 2009.Business Segment OperationsDepositsNet income decreased $1.3 billion to $1.4 billion in 2010 due to a decline in revenue and higher noninterest expense. Net interest income increased $1.1 billion to $8.3 billion as a result of a customer shift to more liquid products and continued pricing discipline, partially offset by a lower net interest income allocation related to ALM activities. Noninterest income decreased $1.8 billion to $5.3 billion driven by the impact of overdraft policy changes in conjunction with Regulation E, which was effective in the third quarter of 2010, and our overdraft policy changes implemented in late 2009. Noninterest expense increased $1.5 billion to $11.2 billion as a higher proportion of banking center sales and service costs was aligned to Deposits from the other segments, and increased litigation expenses partially offset by a decrease in FDIC expenses as 2009 included a special assessment.

securities decreased $1.9 billion reflecting lower impairment write-downs on non-agency RMBS and CDOs.Provision for Credit LossesThe provision for credit losses decreased $20.1 billion to $28.4 billion for 2010 compared to 2009 due to improving portfolio trends across the consumer and commercial portfolios. Net charge-offs totaled $34.3 billion, or 3.60 percent of average loans and leases for 2010 compared to $33.7 billion, or 3.58 percent for 2009.Noninterest ExpenseNoninterest expense increased $16.4 billion to $83.1 billion for 2010 compared to 2009 largely due to goodwill impairment charges of $12.4 billion. The increase was also driven by a $3.6 billion increase in personnel costs reflecting the build out of several businesses, the recognition of expense on proportionally larger 2009 incentive deferrals and the U.K. payroll tax on certain year-end incentive payments, as well as a $1.6 billion increase in litigation costs. These increases were partially offset by a $901 million decline in merger and restructuring charges compared to 2009. Noninterest expense for 2009 included a special FDIC assessment of $724 million. Income Tax ExpenseIncome tax expense was $915 million for 2010 compared to a benefit of $1.9 billion for 2009. The effective tax rate in 2010 was not meaningful due to the impact of non-deductible goodwill impairment charges of $12.4 billion. The effective tax rate for 2010 excluding goodwill impairment charges was 8.3 percent compared to (44.0) percent in 2009. The change in the effective tax rate from the prior year was primarily driven by an increase in pre-tax income excluding the non-deductible goodwill impairment charges. Also impacting the 2010 effective tax rate was a $392 million charge from a U.K. law change and a $1.7 billion tax benefit from the release of a portion of the deferred tax asset valuation allowance related to acquired capital loss carryforward tax benefits compared to $650 million in 2009.Business Segment OperationsDepositsNet income decreased $1.3 billion to $1.4 billion in 2010 due to a decline in revenue and higher noninterest expense. Net interest income increased $1.1 billion to $8.3 billion as a result of a customer shift to more liquid products and continued pricing discipline, partially offset by a lower net interest income allocation related to ALM activities. Noninterest income decreased $1.8 billion to $5.3 billion driven by the impact of overdraft policy changes in conjunction with Regulation E, which was effective in the third quarter of 2010, and our overdraft policy changes implemented in late 2009. Noninterest expense increased $1.5 billion to $11.2 billion as a higher proportion of banking center sales and service costs was aligned to Deposits from the other segments, and increased litigation expenses partially offset by a decrease in FDIC expenses as 2009 included a special assessment.

Card ServicesCard Services recorded a net loss of $7.0 billion primarily due to a $10.4 billion goodwill impairment charge. Net interest income decreased $2.1 billion to $14.4 billion driven by a decrease in average loans and yields partially offset by lower funding costs. Noninterest income decreased $348 million to $7.9 billion driven by lower card income primarily due to the implementation of the CARD Act partially offset by higher interchange income during 2010 and the gain on the sale of our MasterCard position. The provision for credit losses improved $15.4 billion to $11.0 billion due to lower delinquencies and bankruptcies as a result of the improved economic environment, which resulted in a reduction in the allowance for credit losses in 2010 compared to an increase in 2009. Noninterest expense increased $9.8 billion to $16.4 billion primarily due to the goodwill impairment charge.Consumer Real Estate ServicesCRES net loss increased $5.1 billion to a net loss of $8.9 billion in 2010 primarily due to a $4.9 billion increase in representations and warranties provision and a $2.0 billion goodwill impairment charge, partially offset by a decline in the provision for credit losses driven by improving portfolio trends. Mortgage banking income declined driven by the increased representations and warranties provision and lower production volume reflecting a drop in the overall size of the mortgage market. The provision for credit losses decreased $2.8 billion to $8.5 billion driven by improving portfolio trends which led to lower reserve additions, including those associated with the Countrywide PCI home equity portfolio. Noninterest expense increased $3.4 billion to $14.9 billion due to the goodwill impairment charge, higher litigation expense and an increase in default-related servicing expense, partially offset by lower production expense and insurance losses.Global Commercial BankingNet income increased $1.0 billion to $3.2 billion in 2010. Net interest income remained relatively flat as growth in average deposits was offset by a lower net interest income allocation related to ALM activities. Noninterest income decreased $4.2 billion to $3.2 billion largely due to the 2009 gain of $3.8 billion related to the contribution of the merchant services business into a joint venture. The provision for credit losses decreased $5.8 billion to $2.0 billion driven by improvements from stabilizing values in the commercial real estate portfolio and improved borrower credit profiles in the U.S. commercial portfolio. Global Banking & MarketsNet income decreased $1.4 billion to $6.3 billion in 2010 driven by lower sales and trading revenue due to more favorable market conditions in 2009, partially offset by credit valuation gains on derivative liabilities and gains on legacy assets compared to losses in 2009. Sales and trading revenue was $17.0 billion in 2010 compared to $17.6 billion in 2009 due to increased investor risk aversion and more favorable market conditions in 2009. Noninterest expense increased $2.3 billion to $17.5 billion driven by higher compensation costs as a result of the recognition of expense on a proportionally larger amount of prior year incentive deferrals and investments in infrastructure and personnel associated with further development of the business. Income tax expense was adversely affected by a charge related to the U.K. tax rate reduction impacting the carrying value of deferred tax assets.Global Wealth & Investment ManagementNet income decreased $329 million to $1.3 billion in 2010 driven by higher noninterest expense and the tax-related effect of the sale of the Columbia Management long-term asset management business partially offset by higher noninterest income and lower credit costs. Net interest income decreased $205 million to $5.7 billion as the positive impact of higher deposit levels was more than offset by lower revenue from corporate ALM activity. Noninterest income increased $708 million to $10.6 billion primarily due to higher asset management fees driven by stronger markets, continued long-term AUM flows and higher transactional activity. The provision for credit losses decreased $414 million to $646 million driven by improving portfolio trends and the recognition of a single large commercial charge-off in 2009. Noninterest expense increased $1.1 billion to $13.2 billion due primarily to higher revenue-related expenses, support costs and personnel costs associated with further investment in the business.All OtherNet income increased $293 million to $1.5 billion in 2010. Net interest income decreased $1.9 billion to $3.7 billion driven by a $1.4 billion lower funding differential on certain securitizations and the impact of capital raises occurring throughout 2009 that were not allocated to the businesses. Noninterest income decreased $5.7 billion to $6.0 billion as the prior year included a $7.3 billion gain resulting from a sale of shares of CCB and an increase of $1.4 billion on net gains on the sale of debt securities. This was offset by net negative fair value adjustments related to our own credit of $4.9 billion on structured liabilities in 2009 compared to a net positive adjustment of $18 million in 2010 and higher valuation adjustments and gains on sales of select investments in GPI. Also, in 2010, we sold our investments in Itaú Unibanco and Santander resulting in a net gain of approximately $800 million, as well as the gains on CCB and BlackRock. The provision for credit losses decreased $4.9 billion to $6.3 billion due to improving portfolio trends in the residential mortgage portfolio partially offset by further deterioration in the Countrywide PCI discontinued real estate portfolio.

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