Li Lu
Li Lu
13F
Himalaya Capital Management LLC
Last update 2022-11-14 6 Stocks (0 new)
Value $1.74 Bil Turnover 0 %
Portfolio Report

Li Lu Profile

Born and raised in China, Li Lu attended Columbia University, where he received three degrees simultaneously: B.A., J.D., and M.B.A. from Columbia College, Law School and Business School. In 1997, he founded Himalaya Capital, a multibillion-dollar investment firm that primarily focuses on long-term investment opportunities in Asia and the U.S.
Li Lu currently serves as a member of the Board of Trustees of Columbia University and a member of the Board of Trustees of California Institute of Technology (Caltech). He is also a member of the Committee of 100, the Council on Foreign Relations and an Aspen Institute Henry Crown Fellow. He is featured in the Smithsonian Institute's Family of Voices, part of the ongoing Many Voices, One Nation exhibition at the National Museum of American History.
He is the author of "Moving The Mountain: My Life in China" (1990 in English) and "Civilization, Modernization, Value Investing---and China" (2020 in Chinese).

Li Lu Investing Philosophy

Li Lu's firm embraces the value investment principles of Benjamin Graham, Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger. It primarily focuses on publicly traded companies in Asia, with an emphasis on China. The firm aims to achieve superior returns by being long-term owners of high-quality companies with a substantial “economic moat,” great growth potential and are run by trustworthy people.
Li Lu said, "In making investments, I have always believed that you must act with discipline whenever you see something you truly like. To explain this philosophy, Buffett/Munger likes to use a baseball analogy that I find particularly illuminating, though I myself am not at all a baseball expert. Ted Williams is the only baseball player who had a .400 single-season hitting record in the last seven decades. In the Science of Hitting, he explained his technique. He divided the strike zone into 77 cells, each representing the size of a baseball. He would insist on swinging only at balls in his ‘best’ cells, even at the risk of striking out, because reaching for the ‘worst’ spots would seriously reduce his chances of success."
This section is for Premium P Membership subscribers only.
GuruFocus Premium P Membership
  30-year financial data
  All-in-one screener
  Graham, Buffett, and Lynch value screens
  Interactive charts
  Warning signs
  Real time Guru picks and Portfolios
  Excel Add-In, API (2000 queries/month)