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National Grid PLC  (NYSE:NGG) Tax Expense: $462 Mil (TTM As of Sep. 2017)

National Grid PLC's tax expense for the months ended in Sep. 2017 was $208 Mil. Its tax expense for the trailing twelve months (TTM) ended in Sep. 2017 was $462 Mil.


Historical Data

* All numbers are in millions except for per share data and ratio. All numbers are in their local exchange's currency.

* Premium members only.

National Grid PLC Annual Data

Mar08 Mar09 Mar10 Mar11 Mar12 Mar13 Mar14 Mar15 Mar16 Mar17
Tax Expense Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only 840.12 471.76 698.06 608.26 461.73

National Grid PLC Semi-Annual Data

Mar08 Sep08 Mar09 Sep09 Mar10 Sep10 Mar11 Sep11 Mar12 Sep12 Mar13 Sep13 Mar14 Sep14 Mar15 Sep15 Mar16 Sep16 Mar17 Sep17
Tax Expense Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only Premium Member Only 458.59 182.34 173.46 298.77 208.00

Calculation

Tax paid by the company. It is computed in by multiplying the income before tax number, as reported to shareholders, by the appropriate tax rate. In reality, the computation is typically considerably more complex due to things such as expenses considered not deductible by taxing authorities ("add backs"), the range of tax rates applicable to various levels of income, different tax rates in different jurisdictions, multiple layers of tax on income, and other issues.

For stock reported semi-annually, GuruFocus uses latest annual data as the TTM data. Tax Expense for the trailing twelve months (TTM) ended in Sep. 2017 was $462 Mil.

* All numbers are in millions except for per share data and ratio. All numbers are in their local exchange's currency.


Explanation

In the long run, income before tax and taxable income will likely be more similar than they are in any given period. If the one is less in earlier years, then it will be greater in later years. Deferred taxes will reverse themselves in the long run and in total will zero out, unless there is something like a change in tax rates in the intervening period. A deferred tax payable results from a tax break in the early years and will reverse itself in later years; a deferred tax receivable results from more taxes being paid in early years than the tax expense reported to shareholders and will again reverse itself in later years. The deferred tax amount is computed by estimating the amount and the timing of the reversal and multiplying that by the appropriate tax rates.


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